Archive for January, 2011

  • I'm heading off to Amsterdam for one of the top shows in our industry - Integrated Systems Europe. The show covers everything from digital signage to telecollaboration technologies to visualization systems. Once I shake off the jet-lag, I’ll be attending the conference, meeting with partners and colleagues, and generally taking the pulse of the A/V industry. I’ll be sure to post about technologies that seem interesting. Mersive has been working on a joint technology project with Planar and the results will be on display in their booth #3A82. If ...Read More »

  • “We do big things.”  I really liked that as the closer in the President’s speech last night.  I know those things are very pro forma, but it still made me feel really good about the work we’re doing here.  Mersive was founded on the idea that the amazing, immersive, and high-resolution displays currently only used by an elite few can, and should, be available more broadly to our researchers, business community, and educators. As the President said, “in a single generation, revolutions in technology have transformed the way we live, work and ...Read More »

  • I spent years in academic and research lab settings working on computer visualization and when I started Mersive to transform this work into commercial products military and training simulation was the best initial fit.  That said, I always had a vision of much broader applications for large format, incredibly high-resolution (well beyond HD) displays at a very low cost. Imagine a 12 million pixel wall in a children’s classroom being used to visualize the solar system. I’d love nothing better than to know these technologies could inspire the next Carl Sagan. Imagine pixel-rich environments in our public spaces ...Read More »

  • As an entrepreneur, I am passionate about innovation. I am interested in the forces that generate innovative ideas, how those ideas make it into the marketplace, survive competition, and, hopefully, change our lives for the better. Anyone who has let me rant over a few beers will have heard my thoughts on technology-transfer from academia to the commercial arena (something I’ve lived through), the pitfalls of laissez-faire economics on this tenuous process, and my belief that government spending in this arena can serve an important public good. I know some of my more right-leaning readers may be breaking out in a ...Read More »

  • When software drives the display quality of images, resolution and speed of motion, it creates a very life-like seamless and integrated 'reality.’  Right now, I’m in Milan, Italy with one of our partners, Antycip Simulation, who is a provider of some very cool technology across a variety of applications.  One of their areas of focus is simulation so I thought it worth a quick post about how sophisticated displays enable simulation applications. Simulation is useful in a variety of contexts -- from military applications, medical and scientific research (think medical school students performing simulated operations), product design ...Read More »

  • Someone asked me this morning what I thought was “the cool” thing at CES.  Although not nearly as hyped as other stuff there, I was really into seeing the tech advancements for lifelogging, things like Sony’s eye tracker glasses. Ever since Gordon Bell started wearing that camera around his neck over a decade ago I’ve been intrigued by the lifelog concept.  Lifelogging refers to the idea that by augmenting ourselves (or our environment) with the appropriate devices, we can construct a searchable archive that, in some sense, is a shadow of our life experiences.  The ...Read More »

  • As expected, 3D televisions line the show floor this week at CES clamoring for attention like vendors in a Beijing night market. It reminds me of those car lots full of last year’s SUVs  still waiting for an owner on the outskirts of most American cities. When I see something like this, you have to wonder about the market forces that led to the explosion of production on the supply-side. Will demand keep pace? My thinking is probably counter to popular belief, but I am fairly sure that the adoption of 3D television will be far slower than predicted. Although the traditional ...Read More »

  • Wow.  Nvidia announced this week that it will be making a PC CPU.  Great way to start CES off with a bang (or is a shot heard round the Valley?).  Although there have been rumors about this for a while, it is still an important announcement.  Putting their weight fully behind the ARM instruction set, NVIDIA will combine their parallel processing GPU with a CPU to create another GPU/CPU combined architecture, perhaps similar in some ways to AMD’s Fusion.  ARM utilizes 'Reduced Instruction Set Computing' (RISC), an approach to designing CPUs that restricts the operations that can be performed ...Read More »

  • CES starts tomorrow but the marketing hype began weeks ago. Thinking about all the demos I'm struck by how long the lag time until mainstream adoption of these things can be. Of course, new consumer products based on well-known 3D technologies will be pushed heavily. Until plenotic rendering becomes a reality (maybe I’ll blog about that later), 3D will require glasses that limit its usability to situations when you are alone or too engrossed in a movie to care about anyone around you. Let’s face it, glasses are socially awkward, cannot be worn when looking at things other than the ...Read More »

  • As I rode my bike into work today, I passed an ad that reminded me of the tabletop displays from Microsoft that ended up in Harrah’s casino a few years ago. The ad showed a woman with a too-cool-to-care affect, standing next to an illuminated table, holding a drink and beckoning someone to “interact” with her.  Interactive, ambient interfaces, seamlessly integrated into a social setting. Very cool.  I’m sure folks in the Human Computer Interaction (HCI) Community would be proud to know their work is making its way into bars and casinos. This got me wondering why interactive tabletop ...Read More »